Printing my work

“Let’s paint the wall behind your desk in a darker color,” Sweetheart said.

“Mmmm,” I replied, not sure about her proposal. Said wall is covered with photographs and notes my kids have written to me.

“It would be great if you would hang your new work against that wall,” my love continued.
“Mmmm,” I said and my reply was rewarded with a gentle tap of her fist against my shoulder.
“Is that all you have to say?”

I have this thing. I don’t like change except when it I decide it myself. For some reason I kind of freeze when people tell me what to do or push me into altering something.

Sweetheart is of course right. After all she lives here a couple of evenings a week so she is entitled to have to say something about this place.

“Do you think it would be relevant if I write a post about my landscape work, the digital color stuff I did before I met you?”

“When I took away your inspiration?” she smiled.
I love Sweetheart. I really do. She is so pure, so honest. So incredibly hot.

“Yeah. So people can see how my vision has changed,” I continued, desperately changing the subject of the wall to something more mundane.

“I think so. Yes, this is a good idea.”
Sweetheart kissed me; I kissed her and hell, that’s the way we do things.

It was sunny and warm this Sunday with temperatures around 15°C (59°F). It is hard to believe we are almost December.
Unfortunately it was almost noon too so I drove my love to her place where her kids were waiting to brunch with their mom.

Damn it, Sweetheart is so close yet still so far.

Albeit I embrace film and self-developing I am not going as far as getting an enlarger, paper, a red light bulb and whatever paraphernalia is necessary to print.

After scanning my images enter my digital workflow.
Until now I had not thought about printing a black and white photograph.

“The Leaf” was an ideal example so I scanned the negative again, high bit depth and so on, well, the works you know.

I did some burning and dodging in Photoshop and while I was at it I played around with local curves and some masking.

Obviously one doesn’t have the same latitude one has with a digital RAW negative so much really depends on the quality of the shot and the development of the film.

Test printing Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open Digital image
Test printing
Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open
Digital image

I love the Canson RAG Photographique paper for its texture and the way it renders the color photographs I make.
It delivers grand for black and white too.

Preparing the print in Photoshop CC Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open Digital image
Preparing the print in Photoshop CC
Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open
Digital image

In Photoshop I entered following settings for my Canon Pixma Pro 9500 Mark II (Mac OSX Yosemite and latest printer drivers) :

16 Bit Photoshop color management and as printer profile the one I downloaded from the Canson site matching the paper I use. Relative colorimetric and no black point compensation.

I choose the Fine Art “Photo Rag” option and ticked print in grey scales.
I don’t know why but with curves I gave the image a stop extra overexposure in Photoshop before printing.
Experience with my gear I guess.

What I saw on my non-calibrated screen came out of the printer, deliciously rendered.

This first print I made in decades of an analogue photograph will of course be a present for my muse, for my love, for she who means everything in my life.

Here’s to you, Sweetheart.

The final print Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open Digital image
The final print
Olympus OM-D M10 with a Fujian 35mm f1,7 wide open
Digital image
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